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CICASP

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Takakazu Yumoto

Our laboratory is concentration on foods and habitats of primates, feeding behavior, and relationships between primates and other organisms, mainly in Yakushima Island in Japan, and many tropical forests in Malaysia, Congo RD, Gabon, Brazil. Graduate students belong to Primatology and Wildlife Research, Division of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University. Please visit us at Inuyama, Aichi Prefecture, if you are interested in Yakushima Island or tropical rainforests.

Dr. Takakazu Yumoto

Takakazu Yumoto

Professor, Director of CICASP

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Andrew MacIntosh

I am a behavioral ecologist working predominantly on the intersection between animal behavior and parasitism. My work has taken me to field sites in Central America, West Africa, East and Southeast Asia and even Antarctica, where I have studied mainly primates but also seabirds (penguins) and a few other animal species over the years. Students in my lab almost always combine field and laboratory work to enrich their experiences. I teach a variety of courses related to behavioral biology and am a strong proponent of critical thinking, analytical reasoning and the communication of science. I'm always looking for good people in my team, so don't hesitate tocontact me or other members of my team if interested.

Dr. Andrew J. J. MacIntosh

Andrew MacIntosh

Associate Professor

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Yuko Hattori

I am interested in how individuals develop and maintain good relationships in their social environments, and what kinds of communication are used while they interact with each other. Currently, I am focusing on behavioral synchrony and body movement matching in chimpanzees with respect to how these behaviors affect their social relationships. I'm also interested in the evolutionary origins of human musical activities such as dancing and singing. 

Dr. Yuko Hattori

Yuko Hattori

Assistant Professor

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Susumu Tomiya

I study the evolutionary history of mammals to better understand how their diversity is generated, maintained, or lost at various scales of time (hundreds to millions of years) and space (local to continental). I am also passionate about taking care of natural history collections that enable such research, and biology education.

Susumu Tomiya

Program-specific Assistant Professor

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Rafaela Sayuri Takeshita

My main research interest is the use of non-invasive endocrinology in non-human primates to understand how the environment influences welfare and reproductive fitness. My previous studies included health evaluation of captive owl monkeys and measurement of adrenal hormones in captive Japanese macaques. I believe that it is important to study the behavior and physiology of wild primates in order to improve the condition of those living in captivity, and to provide them an environment as closer as possible from their natural habitat. 

Rafaela Sayuri Takeshita

Research Associate

Administration

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Mayumi Tokiyoshi

I have never imagined myself engaging so much with people from various countries, but now I have been having a wonderful time as a member of CICASP. I am not familiar with primatology, but I will support you whenever you are in trouble with life or work in Japan, or whenever you might need help. Do not hesitate, please come to Japan with excitement and expectation! 

Mayumi Tokiyoshi

Administrative Officer

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Sayaka Ouchiyama

I am enjoying my work as a team member of CICASP, which is like a big, international family.  If you are planning to come and join us for study or work, I look forward to helping you settle into your new life in Japan. Our friendly team warmly welcomes you to take your first steps in your new career. Having studied and worked abroad myself, I understand how you might feel, being anxious about starting your new life in a different country. Everyone here has been in a similar situation, so don’t hesitate to call on our assistance as you take this leap forward.

Sayaka Ouchiyama

Sayaka Ouchiyama

Administrative Officer

Students

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Halmi Insani

Past effects of insularity on non-human primates have been a subject of my interest since the discovery of spectacular island effects on fossil humans. Comprised of a galaxy of islands and known as the home of various living non-human primates, the Southeast Asian Archipelago is my study area for investigating how non-human primates evolved, adapted, and survived throughout the islands since 2 million years ago. I have developed geometric-morphometrics analysis on craniodental elements of Macaca, Presbytis, Trachypithecus, Hylobates, Symphalangus, and Pongo, covering both living and fossil specimens.

Halmi Insani

PhD Candidate

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Josue Alejandro

My main interest has been in social and housing enrichment in primates, and how these can ameliorate stress in captive conditions. Although I prefer to see wild animals living in nature, I think it is also very important to study animals in captive environments and learn as much as we can from them. The previous experiences helped me to decide to dedicate my graduate studies in learning more about the primate’s natural behavior, what various factors can affect their stress levels, and how we can measure well-being in a non-invasive ways, for both captive and non-captive primates. In my future studies I plan to look at the primate’s stress levels in various housing conditions while looking at their behaviors, general biological functioning, and hopefully assess a clearer picture of their welfare status. Future plans also include studying wild populations in Japan and other countries in Asia.

Josue Alejandro

PhD Candidate (D3)

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Duncan Wilson

My research interests lie in animal cognition and emotion. I am particularly interested in using cognitive measures from human research to assess emotional states and welfare in non-human primates. My recent research has focused on behavioural laterality (eye preferences) as a potential measure of emotional responses in tufted capuchin monkeys. I am currently investigating attentional bias and emotion in humans and chimpanzees using touch screen experiments.

Duncan Wilson

PhD Candidate

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Jie Gao

I’m generally interested in comparative cognitive science. My previous work was to investigate the understanding of a circular relationship in chimpanzees, our closest relatives, by training them the rule of the rock-paper-scissors game. I found some interesting response by chimpanzees to chimpanzee hands and human hands, and it led me to my current project: body perception in chimpanzees. Bodies are the direct agent of animals to explore and to interact with the environment. Bodies also convey important social cues. I’m interested in how animals (chimpanzees) perceive bodies, and their knowledge about body structures and body parts.

Jie Gao

PhD Candidate

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Vanessa Gris

While biomedical research has a continuing demand for animal models, evaluation of welfare is a crucial issue for the validity of the research and the subject itself. But how do animals process and express pain? How can we recognize and treat it? I'm interested in opioid analgesic effects and in the evolution of nociception and pain behavior, particularly in reptiles and non-human primates. Currently, I am investigating changes in facial expressions of Japanese macaques during painful events using a morphometric approach.

Vanessa Gris

Graduate Student

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Himani Nautiyal

Born and brought up in the Indian Himalayas, my research focuses on conserving this fragile ecosystem and the wildlife in it. My long-term research interests are behaviour, ecology, and conservation of primates living in the Himalayas. My PhD research is focused on understanding the social system and reproductive strategies of Central Himalayan langur (Semnopithecus schistaceusin high altitude forests of  Western Himalayas, India. By Studying this primate species past four years in different forest types in the elevation range of 1,500 to 4,000 meters, I have developed core interest towards understanding their adaptation in harsh climatic conditions.

Himani Nautiyal

PhD Candidate

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Srishti Tripathi

How are emotions and moods embodied in the brain? And how has this evolved in animals and humans? These are interesting reserch questions to explore for many reasons. My research aims to explore the biological mechanisms underlying emotion and its related disorders, and its evolution in primates. My current research investies the underlying neural mechanisms (or neural networks) of grief and mourning using near-infrared spectroscopy brain imaging techniques in humans and non-human primates.

Srishti

Srishti Tripathi

PhD Candidate

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Yuri Kawaguchi

What makes it possible for us to take care of infants? Given that it requires a lot of cost on caretakers, there could be physiological and/or psychological mechanisms that drive us to do so. I'm studying cognition in both human and non-human primates. My research interest is how primates recognize infants of their own species versus those of other species. I am investigating it by studying attention, preference, face recognition ability, etc. in humans and apes. I hope my work will contribute to revealing the evolutionary basis of infant care.

Yuri Kawaguchi

PhD candidate

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Elio Borghezan

I am a doctoral student interested in animal behavior and evolution. I have been investigating mate choice and divergence in secondary sexually-selected traits, particularly how they may affect mating partner recognition in an Amazon fish. Amazon has the highest freshwater faunal biodiversity in the world, and now I am trying to answer the following question: why does the Amazon have such high biodiversity? I am focused on how divergent selection can shape biodiversity in Amazonian rivers and how environment quality (different types of water) affects visual communication, especially sexual communication.

Elio Borghezan

Graduate Student

Alumni

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Tetsuro Matsuzawa

Dr. Tetsuro Matsuzawa is the founding director of CICASP, and a professor in the Department of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, Section of Language and Intelligence. His work in the laboratory at PRI is known as the "Ai project", named after the chimpanzee (Ai) that has been the focus of this pioneering research for more than 29 years. Dr. Matsuzawa has complemented the Ai project with observation of and field-experimentation with the chimpanzee community at Bossou, Guinea, West Africa, since 1986. This research encompasses the synergy of laboratory and field research, and aims to develop a comprehensive and holistic understanding of chimpanzee cognition. 

Tetsuro Matsuzawa

Tetsuro Matsuzawa

Distinguished Professor, Kyoto University Institute for Advanced Studies, Founding Director of CICASP

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Fred B. Bercovitch

The pivotal issue forming a foundation for both conservation and evolutionary biology involves determining factors that influence variation in reproductive success. My research interests, experience, and background aim at meshing social behavior, ecology, genetics, demography, life history, endocrinology, and evolution into a framework for increasing our understanding of mating systems and reproductive strategies.

Dr. Fred B. Bercovitch

Fred B. Bercovitch

Adjunct Professor, Kyoto University (former CICASP Professor 2010-2017)

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David A. Hill

My research examines aspects of the behaviour, ecology and conservation of mammals in forest habitats. Although I spent many years working on macaques, my current research focuses on insectivorous bats. I am interested in the effects of habitat disturbance on the distribution and population dynamics of forest bats, and how secondary forest habitats can be managed to protect and enhance bat communities. I am also investigating social systems of bats and specifically the role of vocal communication in social interactions within and between groups. 

David A. Hill

Adjunct Professor, Kyoto University (former CICASP Professor 2010-2015)

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Ikuma Adachi

My long-term research goal is to better understand the evolution of cognitive abilities in human and non-human animals. My current research has focused on whether non-human animals form cross-modal representations of familiar individuals and species as well as underlying perceptual system behind this. I’m also interested in multi-species comparison and I have studied a wide variety of species, including chimpanzees, four species of old-world monkeys, three species of new-world monkeys, pigeons, dogs, horses. These investigations were conducted in the laboratory using both operant and non-operant paradigms to measure cognitive function.
Dr. Ikuma Adachi

Ikuma Adachi

Associate Professor (former CICASP Assistant Professor 2010-2017)

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Cecile Sarabian

How do animals living in environments where parasites are ubiquitous, avoid infection? With an evolutionary approach to hygiene and disgust, my research focuses on investigating parasite avoidance strategies in primates through field experiments, behavioral observations and parasitology. Better understanding infection-risk avoidance behaviors can have implications in both conservation and public health strategies by informing the design of interventions important in disease control. 

CICASP graduate student Cecile Sarabian

Cecile Sarabian

JSPS Postdoctoral Fellow (from September 2019)

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Lucie Rigaill

My research focuses on investigating the forms, functions, and evolution of primate multimodal sexual communication to better understand how multiple sensory channels may signal female reproductive status and individual characteristics and thus modulate male and female mating strategies (from signal content to signal perception). While my previous work has taken me to mainly study non-human primates, I am conducting my current project on human sexual communication. This research aims at unveiling whether humans share with some non-human primates a colorful trait of fertility.

Lucie Rigaill

Program-Specific Assistant Professor

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Sofi Bernstein

Currently, my research interests include the study of signal systems in non-human animals, particularly vocal communication in non-human primates. My work integrates bioacoustics and cognitive ethology, and I mostly focus on the Macaca genus. I participate in an ongoing collaboration with Anhui University and Central Washington University at the Valley of the Wild Monkeys,China where longitudinal data is being collected on a free-ranging troop of Tibetan macaques. 

Sofi Bernstein

Lecturer, Central Washington University (former CICASP PhD student 2013-2016)

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Dr. Julie Duboscq

  • PhD in Natural Sciences (Dr. rer.nat.), University of Göttingen & University of Strasbourg. Financial support: Volkswagen Foundation and Primate Conservation Inc.

title of thesis: “Social tolerance: novel insights from wild female crested macaques, Macaca nigra”, advisors...

Dr. Julie Duboscq

Researcher (CNRS-France) [previous JSPS Postdoctoral Fellow]

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Valéria Romano

• Evolution of social behavior • Behavioural ecology • Agent/Individual-based modelling • Social network analysis • Complex systems • Wildlife epidemiology • Animal conservation

Valeria Romano de Paula

Valéria Romano

Previous JSPS Postdoctoral Fellow

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Liesbeth Frias

I am interested in how variations in host community composition influence parasite transmission, especifically to what extent parasites are shared across primate hosts (in contrast to being host-specific), whether parasites correlate with/ influence host community structure, and the relationship between habitat fragmentation and both primate and parasite biodiversity. To approach these questions, I am surveying (gastrointestinal) parasite community assemblages in a multi-host system of primates living sympatrically in the Kinabatangan River (Malaysian Borneo). Ultimately my research aims to enhance basic understanding of community level epidemiology involving primates and their parasites in current landscapes for application in wildlife health monitoring, conservation and management, and public health awareness related to parasite transmission between wildlife and human populations. 

CICASP graduate student Liesbeth Frias

Liesbeth Frias

Research Associate, Danau Girang Field Centre, Sabah

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Claire F. I. Watson

Socially transmitted behaviours form the basis of culture. I am especially intrigued by social and communicative cultural variation in non-human primates. My research involves empirical, behavioural studies on captive monkeys. I investigate primate social cognition, in particular social influence on social behaviours and traditions. Other avenues of research include vocalisations in common marmosets and improving primate welfare through enrichment.

Dr. Claire F. I. Watson

Claire F. I. Watson

Program-Specific Associate Professor [former CICASP Research Associate]